Ergonomics

Posted in Computing

I’m deathly afraid of carpal tunnel.

The computer industry doesn’t pay enough attention to this injury or ergonomic issues associated with computer usage. Craning a neck down to read a cramped laptop screen while typing on a flat keyboard is the norm, and while that satisfies a minimalist aethestic, it induces unnecessary and eventually painful joint and posture stress.

I’ve known people whose careers have been affected by CT, and so I’ve decided to spend more money than most to fight off the symptoms: wrist pads, monitor arms, and laptop stands are inexpensive starting tools[1]. Dvorak and lighter keyboard tapping are additional behavioral changes which also have a side effect of increasing efficiency as well.

Next up may be a pair of wrist supports. What’s a little fashion faux pas when career livelihood is on the line?

Footnotes    (↑ returns to text)

  1. Adjustable-height desks and ergonomic chairs are next, but quality ones are considerably more expensive.
  • AcheBreak

    You’re right. There needs to be more awareness about the safe and healthy use of technology.
    It is easy to get caught up in work and forget to take breaks. 

    Designed by healthcare professionals, the mobile app “AcheBreak” is a break and exercise reminder designed to prevent and treat repetitive stress injuries, carpal tunnel injury, forward head posture and texting tendonitis. It is customizable and will help users develop healthy habits, by learning to take mini-exercise breaks regularly.  Since it is on a mobile device, it doesn’t interrupt games, or computer work, but it is used as a reminder to take breaks.  It is customizable for kids, teens, youth and adults.

    Please check out many sources of information here:

    http://www.AcheBreakApp.com,  http://www.AcheBreak.com, FaceBook.com/AcheBreak , Twitter@AcheBreak. Info@AcheBreak.com , YouTube/AcheBreak.com